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Northern Europe and British Isles Luxury Cruise with Silversea Cruises

The British Isles offer diverse experiences and this incredible cruise immerses you in epic scenery, regal traditions, and centuries-old history. Explore maritime heritage in Plymouth, savor Irish flavors in Cork, climb castles in Fishguard, and experience the Beatles' legacy in Liverpool. Uncover Titanic history in Belfast, marvel at Glasgow's grandeur, and immerse yourself in Orkney's ancient traditions. Discover Edinburgh's historic charm, Newcastle's neoclassical architecture, and the charms of Southampton. This journey showcases the region's cultures, histories, and natural wonders.
SHIP: Silver Spirit

Northern Europe and British Isles Luxury Cruise with Silversea Cruises

- SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY
LAST MINUTE
DEPARTURE DATE: July 26, 2024
Countries Visited: England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales
Departure Port:Southampton, England

OVERVIEW

The British Isles has it all – epic scenery, regal pomp and centuries of curious history. Embark on a grand tour of these influential lands, calling at each nation to sample the unique flavours and folklore. Climb crumbling castles in Wales, twist and shout in Liverpool, and discover Belfast’s Titanic history. Newcastle’s neoclassical architecture and Southampton’s charms round off this epic adventure.

Visit 10 ports: Plymouth England; Cork (Ringaskiddy) Ireland; Fishguard Wales; Liverpool UK; Belfast Northern Ireland; Greenock (Glasgow)Scotland; Kirkwall Orkney Islands Scotland; Newhaven (Edinburgh) Scotland; Newcastle England

Cruise on the Silver Spirit – Refurbished and remodelled in 2018, Silver Spirit is the epitome of Silversea elegance. Her guest capacity of 608, her large, open spaces, her many dining options and her all-suite accommodation make her a modern answer for ultra-luxury cruising.

Travel Dates & Pricing

TRAVEL DATEPRICETYPE
July 26, 2024from $8,950 CADPer Person

What's Included

  • 12 night cruise round trip from Southampton in an Ocean View Vista Suite
  • Gourmet Dining in an array of venues
  • 24 hour room service
  • All beverages on board an in suite including champagne, selected wines and premium spirits
  • Gratuities
  • WiFi
  • Round the clock Butler service
  • Taxes and port charges

Itinerary

DAYDATEPLACE
1Fri Jul 26Southampton, England
2Sat Jul 27Plymouth, England
3Sun Jul 28Cork (Ringaskiddy)
4Mon Jul 29Fishguard, Wales
5Tue Jul 30Liverpool, England
6Wed Jul 31Belfast
7Thu Aug 1Greenock (Glasgow), Scotland
8Fri Aug 2Day at Sea
9Sat Aug 3Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
10Sun Aug 4Newhaven (Edinburgh), Scotland
11Mon Aug 5Newcastle, England
12Tue Aug 6Day at Sea
13Wed Aug 7Southampton

Day 1 – Southampton

Home of the ill-fated Titanic departure, Southampton has a long maritime history. Henry V’s fleet bound for the battle of Agincourt left from here, as did the Mayflower (not from Plymouth as many believe) and the great British ocean liners, Queen Elizabeth 2 and Queen Mary both departed on their maiden voyages from the port. So suffice to say, that Southampton is a seafearing place. Today Southampton is the cruise capital of Northern Europe, so expect a city that understands how to have fun. This comes in a variety of ways: a castellated old city that has lots of charm, some excellent museums (the most notable of which is the Sea City Museum) and extensive green spaces. Authentic Tudor remains provide a fascinating insight to 15th century living while other landmarks date back even further. A stroll around the city is generous in its attractions, so there is no better way to see Southampton than on foot. Culture wise, the city’s bustling Guildhall Square is the centre for art, education and food and drink. Southampton’s location of the south coast of England means just a short distance away lie some interesting spots. Pre-historic enigma Stonehenge is less than an hour away while the quintessentially English market town Salisbury is perfect for a bit of shopping. Both are well worth a visit. For those who prefer their entertainment crafted by Mother Nature, a short ride to the New Forest will give you peace; think idyllic glades, ancient woodland, open moors, heathland and cliff top walks.

Day 2 – Plymouth, England

Devon’s largest city is packed with seafaring heritage and quintessential britishness. Tea shops, pubs, a famous gin distillery plus a newly revamp port promenade provide much in the way of gentle entertainment, while those who like to stretch their legs only have to look northwards to the rolling moors. The city is of course most famous for its role in the launching of the Mayflower, as it is from Plymouth that the Pilgrim Fathers left for the New World in 1620 – the original steps may have been lost but a stone plaque allows visitors to stand on the exact spot they left from. The town is peppered with remnants of its historic maritime heritage, across the waters of Plymouth Sound lies fortified Drake’s Island guarding the approaches, while Plymouth Hoe, where Sir Francis Drake was famously playing bowls when he received news of the invading Armada, is just up from the docks. Nearby Royal William Yard, built by John Rennie between 1825-31, boasts the largest collection of Grade 1-listed military buildings in Europe. Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery contains maritime displays including important Napoleonic ship models. The city’s strategic position on England’s south coast cost it dearly during WWII. From 1940-44 the Luftwaffe basically razed the original city, and many of the original building were destroyed. What was rebuilt is more gritty than pretty, but those who are willing to look beyond the dour city centre will find a very pleasing place surrounded by beautiful English countryside.

Day 3 – Cork (Ringaskiddy)

Colourful, quirky and refreshingly laid-back, the Rebel City is a bright and breezy blend of easily-walkable charm and trademark stunning Irish scenery. You may be surprised, as you stroll quietly humming streets, surrounded by the River Lee’s embrace, but this is the Republic of Ireland’s second largest city. Cork is more than happy to fly a little under the radar, however, and this beautiful city is an unbeatable starting point for exploring some of Ireland’s most dramatic western scenery. Cork’s English Market is a delight – try out some of the best juicy Irish beef, seafood plucked the same morning, or the simple pleasure of a quiet cup of morning coffee. The Butter Museum is a low-key joy, and a charming ode to the simple dairy pleasure that forms one of Ireland’s most important exports. Cork is also a rising star in the craft beer world, and you can try the latest and greatest of the contemporary beers brewed here. Or settle into your pick of the vast choice of authentic, characterful pubs – where soupy pints of Guinness – perfectly poured with years’ worth of expertise and care – slip down a treat. Don’t be afraid to explore further afield. Postcard-perfect Cobh is close by, while Blarney Castle is a stout fairy-tale stronghold. Resign to the castle’s folklore – and dangle precariously upside down, while leaning out to kiss the famous Blarney Stone – said to bless you with the ‘gift of the gab,’ otherwise known as the ability to chat articulately. Glorious coastal vistas of emerald green fields, precipitously dropping to thrashing ocean below, await along Ireland’s scenic, windswept western coast.

Day 4 – Fishguard Wales

Perched on a clifftop and stunningly picturesque, Fishguard is considered the very heart of North Pembrokeshire. A small market town that almost seems untouched by time, you’ll find clusters of quayside cottages, family businesses selling local produce and plenty of Gaelic charm! Market day falls on a Saturday and although principally food, there are some stalls selling local arts and crafts too. If you are not lucky enough to be visiting on market day, the pretty high street has some lovely shops where you can easily while away a couple of hours. Known internationally as the place of the last invasion of Britain when the French landed in 1797, the village heaves with history. Historians will of course already know that the two-day invasion soon failed and the peace treaty was signed in the Royal Oak pub in the market square. Over 200 years later the pub still stands and is perhaps one of the best places to soak up the local charm! The real stars of the show here however are the lovely surroundings. The calm waters are perfect for kayaking while walkers will love the national parks that are filled with signposted trails for all levels of ability. Cyclist of all levels will also be pleased; Fishguard and its surroundings do have a few hills, but also lots of straight roads that offer a gentle visit of the stunning landscape. If staying on the water is more your style, then boat trips to see the rest of the lovely coastline can be easily organised in port. If all the activity gets too much for you then why not enjoy a delicious local welsh cake in one of the pretty cafes or head to the town hall and have a look at the 100 foot long Last Invasion Tapestry, a humorous and entertaining story in a Bayeux tapestry style of the 1797 invasion of mainland Britain.

Day 5 – Liverpool

Who can say Liverpool without thinking of The Beatles? Home to the fab four, Penny Lane, Strawberry Fields and the Cavern Club, this northern English city is undoubtedly one of the most important places on the 20th-century music scene. Even UNESCO agrees – Liverpool became a City of Music (one of only 19 in the world) in 2015. So understandably, it’s bursting with pride. Not only for its most famous former residents but also its football team, its maritime heritage and its thriving cultural scene (it was Capital of Culture in 2008). A huge regeneration project over the past two decades has seen Liverpool blossom from being a below-par northern English city to a somewhere buzzing with charm. The arrival of the Tate Liverpool paved the way – quickly followed by the restoration of some 2,500 plus listed buildings (that’s more than any English city outside London). The waterfront revitalisation came next with bars, clubs, galleries and independent boutiques, giving Liverpool some of the best dining and shopping there is. Don’t leave here without tasting Scouse – a traditional beef stew – and from where Liverpudlians draw their nickname “Scousers”. Culturally speaking, Liverpool is “bang on” as Scousers would say. The three Graces (named after the Greek goddesses of charm, beauty and creativity) line the waterfront and are responsible in part for Liverpool’s second UNESCO gong as a World Heritage Site. Further afield, the lovely parks and Crosby Beach offer a welcome respite from the urban hub.

Day 6 – Belfast

Reborn as a cool, modern city, Belfast has successfully left its troubles behind, emerging as a hotbed of culture and architecture, where the comfort of a cosy pub is never far away. Take a voyage of discovery in its maritime quarter, home to a celebrated museum dedicated to the most famous ship ever built, which was constructed right here in the city’s shipyards. A walk across the Lagan Weir Footbridge brings you to Belfast’s fascinating Titanic District – an area of the city devoted to its rich ship-building heritage. The state-of-the-art Titanic Museum brings the story of the doomed vessel to life, and is the largest museum dedicated to the infamously ‘unsinkable’ ship. Wind up a nautical-themed ramble along the Maritime Mile with a visit to SS Nomadic, the smaller cousin of the Titanic, and a ship which serves as a fascinating time capsule back to the pomp and grandeur of the Titanic, while also telling its own stories of service in both World Wars. There’s just enough time to give the 10-metre long Salmon of Knowledge sculpture a quick peck for luck, before continuing to explore. A stark barbed wire and graffitied sheet metal barrier marks an abrupt scar through the city’s residential areas. The Peace Line was constructed during the height of the Troubles, when Belfast was plagued by sectarian divisions between Protestants and Catholics. Nowadays, you can jump in a black taxi tour to see the colourful murals and living history of the walls, which stand as a stark reminder of the fragility of peace. After exploring the city’s historic divisions, a reminder of Belfast’s uniting creativity can be found at the Metropolitan Arts Centre – a seven-storey tall building, which invites light to gloriously cascade inside. The Cathedral Quarter is a cobbled blend of flower-adorned pubs, restaurants and theatres, and venues where music spills out onto the streets at night, and many a pint is cheerily shared.

Day 7 – Greenock (Glasgow), Scotland

A titan of culture and character, with a disarmingly warm welcome, Glasgow is a lively, Scottish city with bucket-loads of personality. Built on a bedrock of hard-work, and deep industrial roots, the city is a fascinating balance of old and new. Architectural treasures like the elegant Glasgow City Chambers of 1888 blend with new, angular shocks like the Riverside Museum and armadillo-shaped Clyde Auditorium – both part of a clutch of exciting new developments along the River Clyde’s banks. Also towering over the river – and perhaps Glasgow’s mightiest symbol – is the Titan – a colossal crane and an almighty reminder of Glasgow’s heritage as a constructor of giant battleships and cruise liners. It is far from a grey industrial city these days, however, and leafy parks, manicured gardens and stacked galleries douse the city with its colour and cultural intrigue. George Square is at the heart of it all, overlooked by Glasgow City Chambers and adorned with memorials, columns and statues honouring influential Scots and Prime Ministers of history. The sounds of shoppers and searing bagpipes rattle along the bustling Buchanan Street, where you can stroll and shop to your heart’s content. Stumble across the West End – Glasgow’s quirkier side – which is brimming with brightly painted cafes and pubs of character and characters, and the perfect spot for a sit-down. Glasgow’s Medieval Cathedral is the city’s oldest building and one of Scotland’s oldest cathedrals, while the university is an immaculate, turreted and vaulted temple of learning. With enormous concert halls, overflowing museums and storied castles, Glasgow is one of the United Kingdom’s most characterful, rewarding cities.

Day 8 – Day at Sea

Day 9 – Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland

heritage. The Viking influence is deep, while a prehistoric past and World War history adds to the endless stories that these dramatic islands have to tell. Sparse and beautiful, let the sweeping seascapes of frothing waves, and dance of the northern lights, enchant you as you explore. Windswept beaches are inhabited by whooping swans, while grassy cliffs hide puffins amid their wavy embrace. Sea caves and crumbling castles – and the dramatic meeting of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean add to the romantic beauty of these lands, which may be physically close to the UK, but feel an entire world away. The sandstone St. Magnus Cathedral is the centrepiece of Orkney’s main town – a place of winding lanes and atmospheric walks – and Britain’s northernmost cathedral is a masterpiece that took 300 years to complete. Started in 1137, the beautiful cathedral is adorned with mesmerising stain-glass windows and has been evocatively named as the Light of the North. Look down over the ruined Bishop’s and Earl’s Palaces nearby from the tip of the cathedral’s tower. Or, test out the islands’ history-rich distilleries, which produce smokey single malts – said to be the best in the world. You can also venture out to Europe’s best-preserved Stone Age Village, at the extraordinary World Heritage Site of Skara Brae, which offers an unparalleled vision into prehistoric life.

Day 10 – Newhaven (Edinburgh), Scotland

Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world’s stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it’s built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capital city, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century.Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur’s Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city. Appropriately, these theatrical elements match Edinburgh’s character—after all, the city has been a stage that has seen its fair share of romance, violence, tragedy, and triumph.Modern Edinburgh has become a cultural capital, staging the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival in every possible venue each August. The stunning Museum of Scotland complements the city’s wealth of galleries and artsy hangouts. Add Edinburgh’s growing reputation for food and nightlife and you have one of the world’s most beguiling cities.Today the city is the second most important financial center in the United Kingdom, and the fifth most important in Europe. The city regularly is ranked near the top in quality-of-life surveys. Accordingly, New Town apartments on fashionable streets sell for considerable sums. In some senses the city is showy and materialistic, but Edinburgh still supports learned societies, some of which have their roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Edinburgh, for example, established in 1783 “for the advancement of learning and useful knowledge,” remains an important forum for interdisciplinary activities.Even as Edinburgh moves through the 21st century, its tall guardian castle remains the focal point of the city and its venerable history. Take time to explore the streets—peopled by the spirits of Mary, Queen of Scots; Sir Walter Scott; and Robert Louis Stevenson—and pay your respects to the world’s best-loved terrier, Greyfriars Bobby. In the evenings you can enjoy candlelit restaurants or a folk ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee, a traditional Scottish dance with music), though you should remember that you haven’t earned your porridge until you’ve climbed Arthur’s Seat. Should you wander around a corner, say, on George Street, you might see not an endless cityscape, but blue sea and a patchwork of fields. This is the county of Fife, beyond the inlet of the North Sea called the Firth of Forth—a reminder, like the mountains to the northwest that can be glimpsed from Edinburgh’s highest points, that the rest of Scotland lies within easy reach.

Day 11 – Newcastle, England

Once a shipbuilding city, Newcastle, remains proud of its history and there’s plenty of it to see, from Roman ruins to its more recent industrial days. Today it’s a city of innovation, using its past to embrace the future.

Welcoming visitors to the area is the unmissable modern sculpture, Sir Antony Gormley’s Angel of the North. This is public art on a massive scale at over 20ms high, a cherished landmark.

The cities of Newcastle and Gateshead face each other across the River Tyne and are united by seven bridges across a spectacular riverside. See for yourself the innovative Gateshead Millennium Bridge in action, a sweeping arc of steel, tilting to allow boats to pass.

The Discovery Museum, bursting with interactive displays, is a thoroughly modern place to learn all about the city’s past. Meanwhile, the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, housed in a landmark, industrial building is a hotspot for modern art lovers.

It’s a passionate city, bursting with character and it’s the friendly locals that make Newcastle a truly special place to visit. “Geordies,” as they are often called, embody the pride, industriousness and resilient spirit of their city and they like to celebrate the fact by having a good time!

Get ready to be charmed by the famous Geordie spirit in a city with award winning restaurants and a thriving nightlife. Live music, comedy, theatre sit comfortably alongside the clubs, cocktail bars and independent breweries.

Day 12 – Day at Sea

Day 13 – Southampton

Home of the ill-fated Titanic departure, Southampton has a long maritime history. Henry V’s fleet bound for the battle of Agincourt left from here, as did the Mayflower (not from Plymouth as many believe) and the great British ocean liners, Queen Elizabeth 2 and Queen Mary both departed on their maiden voyages from the port. So suffice to say, that Southampton is a seafearing place. Today Southampton is the cruise capital of Northern Europe, so expect a city that understands how to have fun. This comes in a variety of ways: a castellated old city that has lots of charm, some excellent museums (the most notable of which is the Sea City Museum) and extensive green spaces. Authentic Tudor remains provide a fascinating insight to 15th century living while other landmarks date back even further. A stroll around the city is generous in its attractions, so there is no better way to see Southampton than on foot. Culture wise, the city’s bustling Guildhall Square is the centre for art, education and food and drink. Southampton’s location of the south coast of England means just a short distance away lie some interesting spots. Pre-historic enigma Stonehenge is less than an hour away while the quintessentially English market town Salisbury is perfect for a bit of shopping. Both are well worth a visit. For those who prefer their entertainment crafted by Mother Nature, a short ride to the New Forest will give you peace; think idyllic glades, ancient woodland, open moors, heathland and cliff top walks.

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